5 USB 3.0 Flash Drives Compared

By · Tuesday, August 3rd, 2010

5 USB 3.0 Flash Drives Compared Are you having a little trouble deciding if USB 3.0 is right for you? Want to see real life transfer rates and comparisons between brands of USB 3.0 flash drives to see which one is better for your buck? Well Tom’s Hardware recently did a comparison between 5 USB 3.0 flash drives to see which one not only performed better than the rest, but to see which one was actually the better buy.

By now, everyone who knows anything about technology has heard of performance increase USB 3.0. USB 3.0 promises up to 10X the transfer speeds of USB 2.0 technology, but when 3.0 was introduced, average speeds were only around 5X as fast. However after several months since 3.0’s inception, companies are promising faster and better performing 3.0 devices than ever before. So Tom’s Hardware decided to test some they could get their hands on. The devices that they tested were the Super Talent SuperCrypt USB 3.0 32GB, the Walton Chaintech Apogee Astro A101 64GB, the PQI S533-E 160GB, the OCZ Enyo 128GB, and the Super Talent USB 3.0 Express Drive 128GB.

So how did each device perform? Well first it should be noted that not a single device beat every other device in all the tests; so if you are looking a 3.0 device that smokes the competition, you won’t find it in this test. What this means is that all of the devices tested did well in certain tests, and perhaps not so well in others; leaving the door open for advantages and disadvantages to each device.

Super Talent SuperCrypt
First on the list was the Super Talent SuperCrypt. This particular device seemed to be lackluster at best with a default driver. It took 4th in the Windows Startup test, 5th in the Windows Defender test, and took 6th in the Video Editing test. Overall, the Super Talent SuperCrypt with the default driver took 6th overall; however, with an enhanced driver, the results were a different story.

With the enhanced drivers, Super Talent’s SuperCrypt took 2nd in the Windows Startup, 1st in the Windows Defender test, and 1st in the Video editing test. With all of these performance increases, the Super Talent SuperCrypt took 1st in overall performance with an enhanced driver as well. That’s a pretty impressive jump in the rankings just by improving the drivers.

Walton Chaintech Apogee Astro A101
Next on the list was the Walton Chaintech Apogee Astro A101. This particular device took 5th place in Windows Startup, 6th in the Windows Defender test, and 3rd in the Video editing test. With performance ranging from 3rd to 6th in particular tests, this device ended up taking 5th in overall performance.

PQI S533-E 160GB
The PQI S533-E USB 3.0 device was tested using the standard settings and a Turbo mode that was built in. For the standard mode, the PQI device did fairly well. In the Windows Startup test it placed 3rd, in the Windows Defender it took 2nd, and in the Video editing test it took 4th. Once all the performance tests were complete, the PQi S533-E 3.0 device took home 3rd in overall performance.

OCZ Enyo
The OCZ was one of those drives that were in the top 3 of every test. This solid 3.0 device took 2nd in the Windows Startup test, 3rd in the Windows Defender test, and 2nd in the Video editing test. In terms of overall performance the OCZ Enyo took 2nd right behind the enhanced driver Super Talent SuperCrypt. This particular device was also Tom’s Hardwars personal pick for best performing 3.0 device they tested as it was a solid performer in all tests and did so without any particular modification or enhancement.

Super Talent Express Drive
The final USB 3.0 device in the tests was the Super Talent Express Drive. Based on the results given for this particular drive, this USB 3.0 device was the worst performer across the board. Across all 3 tests, the Super Talent Express Drive took last in every test. Even with a Turbo mode, this device did poorly as compared to the competition. On a special note, there was one particular test where the Turbo mode actually performed worse than the normal mode.

If you would like to see the results for yourself and see how close each USB 3.0 device was to one another, go visit Tom’s Hardware.

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